The Lahore Agreement Of 1846 Led To

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The Treaty of Lahore of 9 March 1846 was a peace treaty that marked the end of the First Anglo-Sikh War. The contract was signed for the British by Governor General Sir Henry Hardinge and two officers of the East India Company and for the Sikhs by Maharaja Duleep Singh Bahadur, 7, and seven members of the Lahore Durbar who were acting on his behalf. On March 11, 1846, two days after the contract was signed, the same parties signed an additional eight articles. [22] It provided that a British force would remain in Lahore no later than the end of the year “to protect the person of the Maharajah and the inhabitants of the city of Lahore during the reorganization of the Sikh army.” This endorsement was reached at the request of Lahore Durbar. The army of Lahore would evacuate the city, provide favourable quarters for British troops and the Lahore government would pay the additional expenses. [23] The supplementary statutes stipulated that British troops would remain in Lahore by the end of 1846. As time approached for the British to leave, Durbar asked that the troops stay until the Maharaja reached the age of 16. The British agreed and new articles forming the Bhyroval Treaty were being developed. [29] It was signed on 26 December 1846 by Currie, Lawrence and 13 members of Durbar, and ratified by Hardinge and the young Maharaja. The Treaty of Lahore, signed on 9 March 1946, marked the end of the First Anglo-Sikh War, which took place between the Sikh Empire and the East India Company between 1845 and 1846. A key condition of the British agreement was that a British resident officer with an effective facility of assistants be appointed by the Governor General to remain in Lahore, with “full authority to direct and control all matters within each foreign office.” Then, under the Treaty of Amritsar (1846) Maharaja Gulab Singh Jamwal agreed, the British Empire under Article 6: “Maharajah Gulab Singh undertakes to join for himself and the heirs, with all his armed forces, British troops, when deployed in the hills or in areas adjacent to his possessions.” To protect its territories from external enemies. [7] [9] [10] [11] [12] [13] [14] [15] [16] [17] [18] Then the Dogras served the British Empire in the Indian rebellion and in the various wars. [7] [8] [9] [11] [12] [12] [13] [14] [15] [17] [18] This is why a large part of Kashmiri fought in World War I and World War II as part of the Jammu and Kashmir State Forces, and directly with the Royal Navy, the British Army, the Merchant Navy and Gilgit Scouts, as Major William A.

Brown mentioned in his 1947 book The Gilgit Rebellion. A key condition of the British agreement was that a British resident officer with an effective facility of assistants be appointed by the Governor General to remain in Lahore, with “full authority to direct and control all matters within each foreign office.” [30] Regent Maharani Jindan Kaur, mother of the Maharajah, received an annual pension of 150,000 rupees and was replaced by a regency council composed of prominent chiefs and sirdars acting under the control and direction of the British resident. [31] This effectively gave the British control of the government.

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